HomeNewsArticle Display

National Guard to the rescue in 8 states

Loadmasters of the Wyoming Air National Guard watch a one-ton hay bale land near a herd of cows during an emergency feeding mission Jan. 3 caused by a snowstorm that hit the area in southeastern Colorado. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Master Sgt. John Rohrer)

Loadmasters of the Wyoming Air National Guard watch a one-ton hay bale land near a herd of cows during an emergency feeding mission Jan. 3 caused by a snowstorm that hit the area in southeastern Colorado. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Master Sgt. John Rohrer)

ARLINGTON, Va. (AFPN) -- Citizen-Soldiers and Airmen in eight states rescued people and hauled hay to livestock following a severe end-of-year winter storm that stretched from America's northern to southern borders.

Hundreds of Guard members in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas and Washington -- sometimes assisted by other states -- spent their holiday season rescuing stranded motorists, carrying medical supplies and restoring power. In Colorado, Kansas and New Mexico, Guard members dropped hay from helicopters and C-130 Hercules aircraft to starving cattle.

At least 13 people in five states died in the storm.

"That responsibility is one of our primary missions, and we have always responded," Maj. Gen. Mason Whitney, Colorado's adjutant general, told the American Forces Information Service. "That's the strength of the National Guard. We are the forward-deployed forces in communities across America for the homeland defense and emergency response mission."

The Joint Operations Center at the National Guard Bureau -- which coordinates Guard operations worldwide -- and other sources provided this picture of Guard members helping citizens dig out from as much as 3 feet of snow.

Colorado

In Colorado, vehicles stranded by a pre-Christmas snowstorm that dumped 30 inches in the mountains and 9 inches on the plains rendered Interstate 25 impassable, and Guard members helped state troopers clear the road. Drivers were stranded on I-25, US-52 and I-70. Hundreds of miles of interstates were closed.

About 60 Colorado National Guard members rescued dozens of stranded motorists after the most powerful snowstorm in almost four years.

"They're telling me it's zero visibility," General Whitney said. "They'll kind of bump into something, and it'll turn out to be a car with people in it."

The Guard conducted search and rescue missions, provided emergency medical transport and carried supplies to Red Cross shelters.

Citizen-Soldiers and Airmen took food and water to thousands of travelers trapped at Denver International Airport, closed more than two days by the storm.

Five days after the Colorado Guard stood down from that first storm, it swung into action again before the severe blizzard conditions of Dec. 28 and 29. Its joint forces headquarters issued a warning order as the second storm approached.

Colorado Guard leaders anticipated that the new storm, centered on Denver and Colorado Springs on top of previously accumulated snow, could again threaten lives and further disrupt travel. Even before assistance was requested, the Colorado Guard prepared dozens of high-ground-clearance vehicles and aviation assets to aid local emergency responders. Some 166 Guard members stayed overnight at armories to be in position ahead of time.

Challenges included snowfall that varied from 7 to 30 inches and was blown by 70 mph wind gusts, forming drifts up to 6 feet high across roads. Hundreds of motorists were stranded, including tour bus passengers rescued by the Guard on US-287 in Prowers County. Roads again closed, including interstates. The same storm moved down to New Mexico and then on to the Texas panhandle.

Guard members took food, water, blankets and cots to shelters that ran low on supplies. People were trapped in their homes. Power was cut off. The domino effect of disrupted transportation corridors caused grocery stores across the Rocky Mountain states to run short of food for days. Gov. Bill Owens declared an emergency.

More than 126 Colorado Guard members patrolled on the ground and in the air to rescue stranded motorists, provided medical aid to five people, and distributed medicine, baby formula and other critical supplies to isolated areas along the state's Front Range.

"It's amazing to see how people work so well together under stressful conditions," Capt. Jason Stuchlik, 2nd Battalion, 157th Field Artillery, told the Pueblo Chieftain newspaper. Previously, Captain Stuchlik's unit was part of the National Guard's response to Hurricane Katrina. "We are seeing another extreme, from hot to cold," he said. "The Katrina effort has made us more prepared for this situation."

Guard members rescued 134 people and recovered four emergency response vehicles and eight private vehicles.

They conducted medical resupply missions and -- backed by Guard members and air assets from Oklahoma and Wyoming -- dropped hundreds of bales of hay to some of an estimated 345,000 cattle stranded by 10-foot snowdrifts and facing starvation. In 1997, 30,000 cattle died in a Colorado snowstorm.

"You can tell immediately where they are," General Whitney told CBS News. "You'll see a bunch of dark spots clustered together in a sea of white."

Guard helicopters also dropped Meals Ready to Eat outside remote homes.

"It's the middle of nowhere," Army Sgt. 1st Class Steve Segin told CBS News. "You lose the power, you might as well be in 1885. There's no cell phone, no lights, no contact."

Kansas

Some 114 Army and Air National Guard members assisted at emergency shelters and provided power, supplies and transportation after between 15 and 36 inches of snow stranded motorists, emergency services and medical members in western Kansas.

Gov. Kathleen Sebelius declared a disaster area in 44 counties after the storm brought 13-foot snowdrifts. More than 60,000 customers were without power for up to a week after about 8,000 transmission poles were downed.

Some 3.7 million head of cattle, worth $3.4 billion, are located in the affected counties, it was reported Jan. 5.

A UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter stood by for rescues as Guard members helped with house-to-house welfare checks. Four armories served as shelters. Accumulating snow caused a fire department building to collapse, and the Kansas National Guard provided an armory for emergency responders. A UH-60 dropped hay to snow and ice-bound cattle.

Kansas and Colorado agreed to support lifesaving cross-border operations.

Nebraska

About seven Nebraska National Guard members helped utility workers restore power to about 35,000 people left without power for up to a week after the storm downed an estimated 38 major transmission lines in central Nebraska. An OH-58 Kiowa helicopter and a UH-60 helped power officials assess damage.

Western and north-central Nebraska faced freezing rain, heavy snow and strong winds. Some trees had a three-inch layer of ice.

New Mexico

About 20 members of the New Mexico National Guard using a dozen high-wheeled vehicles and helicopters provided emergency medical assistance and rescued stranded motorists, hunters and residents of remote areas.

The record-setting storm turned the desert white and canceled flights. This occurred after a year that had already seen New Mexico Guard members patrolling the border with Mexico as part of Operation Jump Start and providing potable water and equipment to drought-stricken communities, in addition to overseas missions and continued counterdrug activity.

A UH-60 rescued a stranded heart-transplant patient. Another ferried a bulldozer operator to waiting equipment so he could help ranchers get to cattle. Guard members rescued four hunters and pulled people from five stranded vehicles. They provided cots to citizens in three cities.

Gov. Bill Richardson ordered more National Guard UH-60s to provide welfare checks and drop hay.

"We're taking this extraordinary step to assist our farmers and ranchers as they struggle to save their livestock and dig out from the incredible snowfall," Governor Richardson told the Albuquerque Journal. More than 15 inches of snow fell on Albuquerque, an arid desert city.

The New Mexico National Guard surveyed damage and delivered infant supplies to numerous homes, the governor's office reported.

Oklahoma

An Oklahoma National Guard CH-47 Chinook helicopter joined a half-dozen humvees as about 21 Guard members conducted air drops and search-and-recovery operations in Cimarron County in the western part of the state.

Even as it responded in its own state, the Oklahoma National Guard also sent five members to Colorado to operate a CH-47 providing humanitarian and livestock supplies.

Oregon

A CH-47 and two UH-60s from the Oregon National Guard were joined by a C-130 from the Nevada National Guard in a quest to save three climbers missing on Mount Hood.

The C-130 was equipped with infrared and a zooming camera lens. "This is the only one in the Air Force, so if they want this technology. It's coming from Reno," Master Sgt. Craig Madole of Nevada's 152nd Intelligence Squadron told the Nevada Appeal. The same technology was used after Hurricane Katrina.

"Our hearts are going out to the families right now," Capt. Mike Braibish of the Oregon National Guard told the Seattle Times after one climber's body was found Dec. 17. The search for the other two will resume in the spring, officials said.

Texas

The Texas National Guard also anticipated the inclement weather, positioning about a dozen members at the Amarillo Armory who supported public safety workers in the Texas panhandle.

Washington

About 17 Guard members provided generators and other logistics to care centers for elderly people, wastewater treatment plants and other facilities after December windstorms knocked out power.
USAF Comments Policy
If you wish to comment, use the text box below. AF reserves the right to modify this policy at any time.

This is a moderated forum. That means all comments will be reviewed before posting. In addition, we expect that participants will treat each other, as well as our agency and our employees, with respect. We will not post comments that contain abusive or vulgar language, spam, hate speech, personal attacks, violate EEO policy, are offensive to other or similar content. We will not post comments that are spam, are clearly "off topic", promote services or products, infringe copyright protected material, or contain any links that don't contribute to the discussion. Comments that make unsupported accusations will also not be posted. The AF and the AF alone will make a determination as to which comments will be posted. Any references to commercial entities, products, services, or other non-governmental organizations or individuals that remain on the site are provided solely for the information of individuals using this page. These references are not intended to reflect the opinion of the AF, DoD, the United States, or its officers or employees concerning the significance, priority, or importance to be given the referenced entity, product, service, or organization. Such references are not an official or personal endorsement of any product, person, or service, and may not be quoted or reproduced for the purpose of stating or implying AF endorsement or approval of any product, person, or service.

Any comments that report criminal activity including: suicidal behaviour or sexual assault will be reported to appropriate authorities including OSI. This forum is not:

  • This forum is not to be used to report criminal activity. If you have information for law enforcement, please contact OSI or your local police agency.
  • Do not submit unsolicited proposals, or other business ideas or inquiries to this forum. This site is not to be used for contracting or commercial business.
  • This forum may not be used for the submission of any claim, demand, informal or formal complaint, or any other form of legal and/or administrative notice or process, or for the exhaustion of any legal and/or administrative remedy.

AF does not guarantee or warrant that any information posted by individuals on this forum is correct, and disclaims any liability for any loss or damage resulting from reliance on any such information. AF may not be able to verify, does not warrant or guarantee, and assumes no liability for anything posted on this website by any other person. AF does not endorse, support or otherwise promote any private or commercial entity or the information, products or services contained on those websites that may be reached through links on our website.

Members of the media are asked to send questions to the public affairs through their normal channels and to refrain from submitting questions here as comments. Reporter questions will not be posted. We recognize that the Web is a 24/7 medium, and your comments are welcome at any time. However, given the need to manage federal resources, moderating and posting of comments will occur during regular business hours Monday through Friday. Comments submitted after hours or on weekends will be read and posted as early as possible; in most cases, this means the next business day.

For the benefit of robust discussion, we ask that comments remain "on-topic." This means that comments will be posted only as it relates to the topic that is being discussed within the blog post. The views expressed on the site by non-federal commentators do not necessarily reflect the official views of the AF or the Federal Government.

To protect your own privacy and the privacy of others, please do not include personally identifiable information, such as name, Social Security number, DoD ID number, OSI Case number, phone numbers or email addresses in the body of your comment. If you do voluntarily include personally identifiable information in your comment, such as your name, that comment may or may not be posted on the page. If your comment is posted, your name will not be redacted or removed. In no circumstances will comments be posted that contain Social Security numbers, DoD ID numbers, OSI case numbers, addresses, email address or phone numbers. The default for the posting of comments is "anonymous", but if you opt not to, any information, including your login name, may be displayed on our site.

Thank you for taking the time to read this comment policy. We encourage your participation in our discussion and look forward to an active exchange of ideas.